RESEARCH CENTER BORSTEL, LEIBNIZ LUNG CENTER

contact

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schaible
Parkalle 1-40
D-23845 Borstel/Sülfeld
PHONE: +49 4537 / 188 6000

uschaible@fz-borstel.de
www.fz-borstel.de

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 520
FOUNDING YEAR: 1947

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company profile

In addition to the research laboratories, the "Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center" operates a medical clinic with a connected pathology and medical care center, as well as the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria.

The Center treats chronic inflammatory lung diseases. The focus is on non-infection-related diseases such as asthma and allergies as well as the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). On the other hand, inflammation of the lungs, especially tuberculosis, is caused by infection. The overall aim of the fundamentally interdisciplinary research activities is to elucidate the causes and mechanisms of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the lungs in order to derive new innovative concepts for their diagnosis, prevention and therapy.

The research area (RA) ‘Infections’ deals with infectious-inflammatory lung diseases with a particular focus on tuberculosis (TB). The RA combines studies on the genomic diversity of the TB pathogens, the evolution and spread of various pathogen variants, their virulence and persistence, and analyzes the genetic and physiological basis of the pathobiological properties being responsible for the susceptibility of the host or its protection against the infection or the disease. Special attention is paid to further improve the diagnosis and clinical management of patients with resistant TB, as well as to monitor the spread of multiple-resistant strains by effective molecular-epidemiological monitoring of the pathogens. High-throughput sequencing are used for the genome analysis of clinical tuberculosis strains and is combined with complex studies on host response to infection at the immunological and metabolic levels. Thus offering new possibilities for targeted antibiotic development as well as target structures for innovative host-modulating therapies, so-called host-directed therapies (HDT).